Mexican dictator Porfirio Diaz created a vision for a national project based on the transference (importación) of a European model. This project studies the symbols of power used in his urban reform plan for Mexico City, a policy of “order and progress” that was determined to transform the urban space into one reminiscent of Paris or London, and that set the grounds for the Mexican Revolution, a complex and multifaceted event with particular characteristics that do not compare to the revolutionary processes in Latin America or the rest of the world. Neoclassical, gothic and romanesque symbols including lions, laurels and greek columns invaded the urban landscape with huge architectural projects commissioned to European artists and architects. 

 

This project explores how identities come into collision, creating sculptural pastiches and imagining futures through the construction of a new narrative that plays with historical fictions. The first piece exists in the digital realm, as a virtual installation in which I am building a "stage" based on buildings commissioned by Diaz. The second is a series of fictional fragments of the “ruin” of the National Courthouse, designed by Émile Bénard, whose construction was interrupted by the outbreak of the Revolution and was left unfinished until it became the Monumento a la Revolución in the late 30’s. I am using images of greek fragments that were stolen by the British museum and mixing the motifs with those found in the drawings and plans of the design proposals that were presented for the Courthouse in the late 19th century. 

work under construction /// proyecto en construcción  

Escenografía para una revolución  (Stage for a revolution), 2020

Virtual installation, under development

Escenografía para una revolución , 2020

Instalación virtual, en proceso

A Fragment of the Courthouse, 2020

Plaster

15 x 13 cm

Un fragmento del Palacio Legislativo 

Yeso 

15 x 13 cm